PCC 007: How Podcasting Can Change Lives and Build Businesses With Cliff Ravenscraft

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The Professional Content Creation Podcast

In today’s episode of The Professional Content Creation Podcast, I’m thrilled to welcome Cliff Ravenscraft, the Podcast Answer Man. Cliff left a lucrative career in the insurance industry to pursue his passion: podcasting.  Initially the transition was a rough one financially, but his income from podcasting now far exceeds what he ever made in insurance. But for Cliff, podcasting is not just about money; Cliff shares with us how  the over 3,000 podcast episodes he has produced have changed not only his life, but the lives of his listeners as well.

In this episode we talked about:

  • How Cliff first heard about podcasting.
  • The frustrations Cliff had with traditional radio programs that you don’t have with podcasts.
  • The equipment Cliff used when he first started podcasting and how it’s progressed over the years.
  • The advantages to podcasting compared to other types of content such as written blog posts.
  • Why to go with audio podcasts, instead of video.
  • How video podcasts that have been turned into audio can make the listeners feel like second class citizens.
  • The ideal podcasting frequency and length.
  • What Cliff could to do double the number of his weekly listeners — and why he chooses not to to it.
  • How Cliff’s wife, Stephanie, felt about him quitting his job to podcast full-time.
  • How to podcast in a way that you go beyond the intellect and reach people’s hearts.

Items mentioned in this episode include:

 Would you like to start a podcast?

If you’re a “do-it-yourself” kind of person and want to start a podcast, I’d strongly recommend Cliff Ravenscraft’s Podcasting A to Z course. If interested in the training and in getting the $100 discount, go to http://PodcastingAtoZ.com and use the discount code PCC in the shopping cart.

If you’d like to start a podcast but would prefer to have someone else handle many of the aspects of your podcast for you, check out my Podcast Production Services page for details of how I can help.

Subscribe via RSS
The Professional Content Creation Podcast: Content Creation | Blogging | Content Marketing

Click here to download the transcript. 

Do you listen to podcasts? Have you ever considered starting a podcast to share your passion and expertise? Share your experience or questions in the comment section below.

How to Use Google Drive for Content Marketing for Your Business (An Introduction)

 

Google Presentation as alternative to PowerPoint

This is an example of a slideshow I made using Google Presentation, which I then uploaded to SlideShare.

I just recently bought a Chromebook, and it came with 100 GB of free storage on Google Drive. That, coupled with how much I use Google (gmail, Google calendar, etc.) has put me on a quest to maximize all that Chrome and Google has to offer me as a small business owner, particularly as it relates to the content marketing I do for my business.

I’m sure that I’ll come up with more ways to use Google Drive in the future, but here are some ways that I’ve already started using it for content for my business. You can use these ideas whether or not you have a Chromebook, but you will need a free Google account.

1. Share files.

Okay, so it’s no big surprise that you can share files that you’ve uploaded to Google Drive, but now that I have as much storage as I do, I’m uploading ALL of the files that I need to share with others. For instance, I uploaded the latest podcast episode .mp3 and share the link with my transcriber. I have nothing against Dropbox, and in fact have used it quite a bit and still will when people share files with me. But since I’m generally logged in to Gmail pretty much all day, it’s great to be able to upload and share files without logging into to another account.

2. A place for everything and everything in its place.

I’ve had a particular problem not just with content marketing, but with. . . life. If you’re like me, you have documents, images, to-do lists, links to helpful information, journal entries, and who knows what else stored online everywhere from Evernote to Pinterest to Wunderlist. I’ve ended up with material of various types so many different places that I don’t even know where all of it is. That’s a bit disconcerting when you consider that I generally store things so that I can find them when I need them.

Google Drive has solved that problem for me. Or perhaps I should say, “is solving” that problem for me since I still have a lot of content all over the place.

Google Drive uses the familiar folder system, probably much like what you use on your PC or Mac already;I’ve found it best to use a similar (if not identical) system for organizing my documents on Google Drive.

If you keep everything that you need related to content marketing on Google Drive, instead of having things stored all over the Internet, you’ll be more likely to be able to find it when you need it.

3. Create presentations from within Google Drive.

I’m not currently doing any speaking, but that doesn’t mean that PowerPoint presentations don’t have a place in my content marketing mix. The difference is that I now use PowerPoint to create slideshows that I upload to places like SlideShare, so that I can then embed them on my blog posts and pages on my site.
The great news is that there is a free PowerPoint knock off in Google Drive. It has a very limited number of templates, but the good news is that I can upload PowerPoint templates and then create the slideshows within Google. In order to do this, just be sure to have “conversion” turned on when you upload the template. What that does is convert it to the Google Drive version, so you can edit it.

What I’m liking about using this on Google is what I like about using Google Drive in general — I can work on and access the presentation from any computer with an Internet connection.

4. Gather feedback from your customers.

There are a lot of great ways to get feedback from your customers or potential customers, some paid, some free.

A great free option that comes built in to Google Drive is Google forms. You can set up any questions you want, complete with various ways that people can respond (e.g. dropdown menus, multiple choice, short answer, long answer, etc. You can make some fields required, and some optional.

When people fill out the form, their responses will go right into Google Drive, so no need to log in someplace else to retrieve them.

You can link directly to the form or embed the form on your website. The only downside that I’ve discovered so far is that at least in my experience, I haven’t received any type of notification when someone fills out the form, so I have to check periodically to make sure I don’t miss anything.

Your Turn:

Do you use Google Drive? If so, how? How would you use it if you had 100 GB memory available to you?

PCC 006: Content Marketing Success Story — A 150% Increase in Traffic Per Day [Podcast]

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The Professional Content Creation Podcast

In this episode of The Professional Content Creation Podcast, I interview Ryan Hanley, of RyanHanley.com. I really respect Ryan because he didn’t let the skepticism that his insurance agency had toward content marketing to deter him from using content as a way of finding prospects. Instead, he came up with a creative solution that gave him an opportunity to learn and prove the effectiveness of content marketing even though he was initially unable to even post on the company website.

The great thing about Ryan is that he has moved far beyond content marketing theory in that he has a proven track record of the effectiveness of content marketing for business.

If you’re a business owner who wonders if content marketing can work for you, I think you’ll find Ryan’s experience and his tips to be inspiring and helpful.

In this episode we talked about:

  • What Ryan had to to do overcome his boss’ skepticism regarding the power of blogging
  • How the movie, Pulp Fiction inspired Ryan is his content marketing strategy
  • The impact of writing 100 blog posts in 100 days
  • How Ryan went beyond the blog to fast forward his content marketing strategy
  • The importance of answering customer questions
  • Ryan’s promotion that came about as a direct result of his success with content marketing
  • How Ryan came up with the name, “Content Warfare” for his podcast, and what it means
  • Why the “upper eschelon” bloggers are wrong when it comes to blog traffic
  • The different types of content that Ryan produced to market his business
  • The most crucial element of taking your content to the next level
  • The importance of using “power words” in your content

Items mentioned in this episode:

 Would you like to start a podcast?

If you’re a “do-it-yourself” kind of person and want to start a podcast, I’d strongly recommend Cliff Ravenscraft’s Podcasting A to Z course. If interested in the training and in getting the $100 discount, go to http://PodcastingAtoZ.com and use the discount code PCC in the shopping cart.

If you’d like to start a podcast but would prefer to have someone else handle many of the aspects of your podcast for you, check out my Podcast Production Services page for details of how I can help.

Subscribe via RSS
The Professional Content Creation Podcast: Content Creation | Blogging | Content Marketing

Click Here to Download the Transcript for Episode 006 (PDF)

What type of experiences have you had with using content to market your business? Share your experience or questions in the comment section below.

content marketing for insurance

Ryan Hanley

Ryan Hanley is the director of marketing for The Murray Group Insurance Services Inc. which is located in Albany, New York. There Ryan is tasked with building relationships, increasing brand reach and ultimately driving new business sales through both traditional and online marketing strategies.

If you would like to learn exactly what Ryan does to market his insurance agency online, visit www.RyanHanley.com where he talks about content marketing, social media and being awesome online which as Ryan states is the most important part.

The Importance of Testimonials on Your Website and How to Get Them

Content creation often brings to mind blog posts, videos, and podcasts. Naturally, those are all important types of content, but when planning content for your website, it’s important to think of the big picture, which includes the various pages on your site. One such page is your testimonials page, and your services or products pages that may also include testimonials.

Anyone who has followed me for awhile knows that I “preach” that content is a great way to build credibility and trust, and I absolutely believe that. However, great content is only part of the formula when it comes to building your reputation. Recommendations from others, be it a personal recommendation from a client, or testimonials on a website, can also go a long way toward gaining the trust of potential clients and customers.

“The Testimonial Put Me Over the Top”

After finishing a project for a brand new client I asked, “How did you hear about me?” She responded, “I noticed you from a guest post you did: http://www.amyporterfield.com/2012/10/google-calendar-editorial-calendar/  a friend posted it on Facebook, and I liked that you were thorough and professional.  When I went to your site, the Pat Flynn testimonial put me over the top.  I’m a big fan of his, and I know he has his stuff together, and wouldn’t just recommend anyone.”

Notice how the thing that first got her attention was that my blog post was “thorough and professional,” which underscores the importance of good quality content. But the thing that put her over the top was the testimonial. This is a great example of how content such as blog posts, combined with testimonials can build trust and lead to sales.

How to Get Testimonials From Your Clients and Customers

Getting testimonials is not as hard as you might think. Here are a few things that I’ve found help tremendously.

1. Provide services and products that are “testimonial worthy.”

Let’s face it, if your services or products stink, people aren’t going to want to provide testimonials for you. So the first step in gaining testimonials is to always, at the bare minimum, do what you promise, or even better, go the extra mile and exceed the expectations of your clients and customers. If you find that you’re embarrassed to ask for a testimonial, it could be that you’re not confident in the quality of what your business provides, and if that’s the case, that’s the first thing you need to fix. This brings me to my next point:

Ask for testimonials

People seldom provide testimonials unless they’re asked.

2. Ask for the testimonial.

While some people may voluntarily provide a testimonial without prompting, most will not — even if they are very happy with your products or services. However, I have found that in most cases, even very busy people will provide a testimonial, when asked — assuming that they are happy with the work you did for them or the products they purchased from you.

Tip: Ask for a testimonial right away, as soon as you complete a project. This is often the time when people feel the most positive about you, particularly if you’ve hit the ball out of the park on the project. I’ve found it helpful to send a thank you email to let a client know that I appreciated the opportunity to do the work for them, and then let them know that it would mean a lot to me if they would provide a testimonial.

3. Make it easy for the person to write the testimonial.

I believe there are two main reasons why people may not provide a testimonial for you, even if they are happy with you. First, a lot of people get stuck, and just don’t know what to say. This is especially true if they haven’t written testimonials before, or if they don’t like to write. Second, people are busy, and may have good intentions, but never quite get around to writing the testimonial for you.

I’ve found  a solution that has, up to this point, worked 100% of the time for me; I provide a short series questions for the person to answer, with the offer to write the testimonial for them, once they provide the answers. This has worked great for me, because people often respond immediately after receiving the email from me, because it is so easy and takes them only a few minutes. The questions I ask are:

  • List 3 things you liked about the product or service
  • Would you recommend this product or service to others? Why?
  • Is there anything else you’d like to add?

I also ask for a photo, and what website they’d like me to link to.

How to Verify That Testimonials On Your Site Are Legit

There can be skepticism regarding testimonials on a website. After all, a business owner could write anything and put it on a website. But there are a few ways to give people peace of mind regarding the validity of the testimonials. Here are a few ideas to get you started:

  • Include both a first and last name. You may not be able to do this if the service or product you provide would embarrass people in some way, but for most businesses, this shouldn’t be a problem.
  • Include a photo of the person. If you’re unable to obtain a photo of the person, the logo will do, but unless the company is really well know, it’s not as ideal, since photos feel more personal.
  • Include a link to the website.

Also, since it is now easy for people to check your business out online, whenever possible, have the same testimonies posted places that you don’t control, such as LinkedIn. I didn’t do this at the beginning, but after the testimonial has been written, I now send a request for a recommendation via LinkedIn. Since the testimonial has already been written, it takes just a few minutes for the person to help me out in this way, and assuming they are on LinkedIn, most are happy to do so.

Your Turn

Do you generally ask for testimonials? What things have you found helpful when it comes to increasing the number of people willing to provide testimonials? Any ideas for improving the quality of the testimonials?

PCC 005: Understanding Kindle Publishing Options [Podcast]

podcast, why start a podcast, podcasting tips, benefits of podcastingThis episode of the Professional Content Creation Podcast was inspired by one of my clients. In addition to offering Kindle editing and formatting services, I also provide Kindle consultation phone calls.

As I was recently going over the various Kindle publishing options with one of my clients, the thought came to me that my podcast listeners may find the information helpful in case they want to submit their eBook to Kindle on their own. Listen in if you need to know what all the options inside the KDP dashboard mean!

Items discussed in this episode include:

  • The ins and outs of the KDP Select program
  • How you can increase your income by giving your book away for free
  • How letting people borrow your Kindle book for free can make you money
  • Title restrictions
  • Why you don’t need to worry about your Kindle book’s publication date
  • How easy it is to be a publisher
  • Selecting categories and keywords
  • Tips for your Kindle book cover
  • The ONE thing you can’t change after your Kindle book is published
  • What Digital Rights Management means
  • Why you may want people to be able to illegally share your Kindle book
  • The different royalty options
  • Important things to keep in mind when inputting contributors
  • And more!

 As promised, below is a slideshow with the main points. Feel free to refer to it when the time comes to upload your own Kindle book. You are also free to embed the slideshow on your blog by clicking on the share button and copying the embed code. Enjoy! 

 

 Would you like to start a podcast?

If you’re a “do-it-yourself” kind of person and want to start a podcast, I’d strongly recommend Cliff Ravenscraft’s Podcasting A to Z course. If interested in the training and in getting the $100 discount, go to http://PodcastingAtoZ.com and use the discount code PCC in the shopping cart.

If you’d like to start a podcast but would prefer to have someone else handle many of the aspects of your podcast for you, check out my Podcast Production Services page for details of how I can help.

Subscribe via RSS
The Professional Content Creation Podcast: Content Creation | Blogging | Content Marketing

Click Here to Download the Transcript for Episode 005 (PDF)

Have you ever thought about publishing a Kindle book? What’s the biggest challenge facing you that’s keeping you from getting it done? Leave me a comment below to share your thoughts and experiences!

PCC 004: Keys to Successful Podcast Interviews: John Lee Dumas

podcast, why start a podcast, podcasting tips, benefits of podcastingWhen I decided to start a podcast, John Dumas, of Entrepreneur On Fire was one of the first people I wanted to interview. The reason? He publishes a podcast interview not once a week, but every single day, Monday through Friday. Since I’m newer to podcasting, and very new to interviewing, I knew that I could learn a lot from interviewing John.

In this interview, John provides a lot of great insight into how to conduct successful podcast interviews.

Here are some of the questions that I asked John in the interview:


1.  There are many different types of content. What made you choose to focus on podcasting rather than other types of content?

2.  Many people who have podcasts only produce a new episode once a week, a couple of times a month, once a month, or sporadically. Your podcast is different in that you publish an episode every day, Monday – Friday. Why did you decide to publish one every day?

3.  What challenges and benefits have you experienced as a result of publishing your podcast daily, and have you ever wished that you hadn’t made such a huge commitment?

4.  One thing I noticed is how many “big name” people you had on your podcast right from the start. How did you manage to land so many big name people so early, before your podcast had a proven track record?

5.  What advice would you give to people who want to reach out to people who are leaders in their field, when they themselves are still in the early stages of blogging, podcasting, or other types of content creation?

6.  At the time of this interview, how many podcast episodes have you produced?

7.  Out of all of those podcasts, which ones stand out to you as being the most memorable and why?

8.  How has interviewing all of these great entrepreneurs shaped your own entrepreneurial journey?

9.  You obviously have a lot of experience interviewing people. What do you feel are the keys to a successful interview?

10.  What is the number one piece of advice you’d give to someone who wants to start a podcast?

 Mentioned in this Episode

Do me a big favor!

I would LOVE it if you would drop by iTunes and leave me a 5-star rating and review. This will help me to show up better in search results. And while you’re there, please subscribe!

Connect with John!

If you’d like to check out some of John’s podcast, visit his website, Entrepreneur on Fire or follow him on Twitter.

 Would you like to start a podcast?

If you’re a “do-it-yourself” kind of person and want to start a podcast, I’d strongly recommend Cliff Ravenscraft’s Podcasting A to Z course. If interested in the training and in getting the $100 discount, go to http://PodcastingAtoZ.com and use the discount code PCC in the shopping cart.

If you’d like to start a podcast but would prefer to have someone else handle many of the aspects of your podcast for you, check out my Podcast Production Services page for details of how I can help.

Subscribe via RSS
The Professional Content Creation Podcast: Content Creation | Blogging | Content Marketing

Click here to download the transcript. 

 

Pros and Cons of the KDP Kindle Select Program

 

Pros and Cons to the KDP Select Program

As is true with most things, there are pros and cons to the KDP Select program. Only you can determine if it’s the best option for your Kindle book.

One of the decisions that authors who publish Kindle books have to make is whether or not to enroll in KDP Select. In order to know whether or not it’s the right option for your Kindle book, you need to understand what the program is, as well as the pros and cons of enrolling in KDP Select.

Limitations of KDP Select

The biggest thing to be aware of with KDP Select is that if you enroll in the program, you cannot offer your eBook anywhere else for a period of at least 90 days. For example, you cannot offer a PDF for sale (or free) of the same eBook on your website, and you cannot sell it on Barnes and Noble or any other site while it’s in the program

It’s important to understand, however, that you can offer it in a different form, such as a print version, without any restriction during the time it is enrolled in KDP select.

Offering Your Kindle Book for Free

There are certain “benefits” to KDP such as being able to offer your book for free. You can offer it for free for up to five days during each 90-day period of time. The free days can be one after another (e.g. five days in a row), or they can be spread out over the 90-day period of time.

Amazon Prime members can also “borrow” KDP Select books for free. Think of this option as people being able to check your book out from the library. They don’t own it, and can only have it for a limited period of time, but it doesn’t cost them anything to borrow it.

Benefits of Giving Your Kindle Book Away for Free

I put the word, “benefits” in quotes because some may wonder how or why it is beneficial to give something away for free, particularly if you are hoping to make money through the sales of your eBook.

Offering your book for free can help it rank better in Amazon, assuming that a lot of people “purchase” it on the free days. Ranking higher in Amazon will give your book more future exposure and can potentially result in more sales down the road.

In order for this strategy to be effective, it’s important to really promote it on the free days, and encourage people in your circles to “buy” it on those days, even if it isn’t a topic they’re interested in. For example, let’s say that I had an eBook on the topic of content marketing in the KDP Select program. My 81-year-old mother is not interested in content marketing, so except to support me, she wouldn’t purchase a book on the topic. But I could encourage my mom, and other supportive people like her, to buy my book when it’s free as a way of helping my book to rank better on Amazon.

And naturally, an opportunity to pick up your book for free is a great bonus to give your fans and the people on your email list.

Benefits of Letting People Enrolled in Amazon Prime Borrow Your Kindle Book for Free

One thing that may not be immediately apparent is that even though Amazon Prime members don’t pay anything to borrow your Kindle book, you are paid royalties every time someone borrows your book.

The royalty amount is based on a complex formula that has to do with, among other things, the total number of books borrowed during a set period of time. Since the amount changes, I can’t give a specific amount, but in most cases at the time of this writing, it is about $2.50 each time someone borrows your Kindle book.

This is beneficial, especially if your Kindle book is on the lower end of the price spectrum. For instance, let’s say that your Kindle book is priced at $2.99, with a 70% royalty, the amount paid to you in royalties for each sale is $2.09. In most cases, on lower priced books, you will make as much, if not more, with royalties if people borrow your book than if they were to purchase it outright.

The Dark Side of the KDP Select Program

Okay, “dark side” is stretching it a bit, but while  there are tremendous benefits to enrolling your Kindle book in KDP Select, there are also some downsides.

Though I’ve already mentioned this, it bears repeating that you cannot offer your Kindle book anywhere else, even on your own website for paid or free, during the 90 days it’s enrolled in KDP Select. If you don’t have plans to do anything else with your eBook during that period of time, this is no big deal, and it certainly isn’t a deal breaker. A bigger deal in my mind is the possibility that you’ll miss your target market.

 

kindle book target market

Many of the people who pick up your Kindle book when it’s free may be people outside your target market.

Missing Your Target Market

There’s something weird that happens in people’s mind when something is offered for free. People often grab up massive amounts of free items that they would never pay for. The problem with this as it pertains to Kindle books is that those people who have received your book for free may not be your target market, and therefore your book may not resonate with them.

Is it a big deal if people who got your eBook for free don’t like it? Well, it could be, particularly if they decide to express their dislike in the form of a negative review and a one-star rating. This would be even more likely to happen if your book is controversial in any way, or contains content (e.g. religious or political) that people tend to have strong feelings about, one way or another.

Obviously, you can get positive reviews from people who get your book for free, and negative reviews from people who pay for your Kindle book, but the bottom line is that the odds are greater that the people who will spend money on your book are ones who fit into your target market.

Too Much Free Stuff on Kindle

Another negative byproduct of KDP Select is that as the program has increased in popularity, there are a lot of free Kindle books out there. Though I don’t have statistics to back this up, knowing human nature and the love for free items, no doubt many people only “buy” books when they are free.

This can make it harder and harder to sell your books at a decent price, unless you have a decent sized platform of fans who are more than happy to pay for your books.

You may also find that the majority of the people on your email list and your fans and followers on social media may pick up the book while it’s free, leaving few to buy it when it actually costs them money.

Is KDP Select Right for YOU?

There isn’t a one-size fits all answer to this question. Personally, I would recommend trying it, and measure the results. If you have multiple Kindle books, enroll some of them in KDP Select, and opt out of that for others, and then evaluate the outcome of both options.

 Your Turn

 I’d love to hear your thoughts on the KDP Select program. Do you think it’s a good idea? Have you ever used it yourself? Please share your thoughts and experiences in the comment section below. 

 

PCC 003: Jon Loomer Interview on All Things Facebook

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podcast, why start a podcast, podcasting tips, benefits of podcastingJon Loomer, of jonloomer.com is my guest on today’s podcast episode. Jon is best known for his passion for and expertise in Facebook.

What we covered in this episode:

In this episode we talk about the good, the bad, and the ugly — but mostly the good, about Facebook. We delve into why and how Jon got started with Facebook, and what has contributed to his quick success in the competitive social media market.

#1: How desperation helped Jon’s business to be a success.

Jon lost his job. He was the sole provider for his family — a wife, and 3 little boys. While necessity may be the mother of invention, desperation can be a big motivating factor when it comes to doing whatever needs to be done in order to make a business a success.

#2: Jon’s accomplishments his first year of business and how he managed to achieve so much so fast.

  • Surpassing a million page views
  • 7,000 Facebook fans
  • Created his first products
  • Website sponsors
Jon attributes his success to the need to provide for his family, plus since he didn’t have another job, he was able to focus his time and attention on hitting the ground running hard.

#3: What differentiates social media that makes a difference from social media that doesn’t really accomplish anything. 

Here is part of Jon’s answer:

“So for me, it all comes down to value. So, social media that makes a difference is two things first of all. It’s from two different perspectives. You’re making a difference for the user so you’re providing value to them that makes a difference in their life in some way.

Now whatever it is whether you’re educating them, providing them information they didn’t know about before that makes their life easier, providing them discounts, whatever. But it can’t be all about promoting yourself.”

#4: Why Jon chose to specialize in Facebook instead of any of the other social media platforms out there.

Jon got his start with Facebook in 2007, when he handled Facebook as part of his job working for the NBA. I’ll let you listen as he tells that story!

#5:  Jon obviously loves Facebook, but since so many people have a love-hate relationship with Facebook, I asked Jon to talk about the one thing he would change about Facebook if he could.

One thing Jon loves about Facebook that drives a lot of people bonkers is how they are always changing things. He sees all the Facebook changes in a positive light because they’re a sign of progress. In terms of the one thing he wishes that Facebook would change is that he’d prefer they were more transparent.

#6: With blogs and all of the different social media platforms that are available, a lot of people struggle with overwhelm when it comes to their online content.  We discussed how people can make steady progress online without becoming overwhelmed. 

We talked about the importance of having a vision and having small celebrations, celebrations of success, small goals that are reachable in building up those.

Jon Loomer

#7: If Jon was starting from scratch with content marketing, what would he do differently? 

On this point I’ll just say that it has to do with money!

Connect with Jon Loomer

If you’d like to learn more about Jon and reach out to him, check out his blog or Like his Facebook Page.

Do me a big favor!

I would LOVE it if you would drop by iTunes and leave me a 5-star rating and review. This will help me to show up better in search results. And while you’re there, please subscribe!

 Would you like to start a podcast?

If you’re a “do-it-yourself” kind of person and want to start a podcast, I’d strongly recommend Cliff Ravenscraft’s Podcasting A to Z course. If interested in the training and in getting the $100 discount, go to http://PodcastingAtoZ.com and use the discount code PCC in the shopping cart.

If you’d like to start a podcast but would prefer to have someone else handle many of the aspects of your podcast for you, check out my Podcast Production Services page for details of how I can help.

Subscribe via RSS
The Professional Content Creation Podcast: Content Creation | Blogging | Content Marketing

Download the transcript.

How to Blog Consistently When You Don’t Have Time

I know how this poor woman feels. This is what I look like when I’m too tired to write blog posts!

Small business owners like you – and like me – never seem to have enough time. This is especially true for solopreneurs, and those with very small teams, since if you don’t do whatever needs to be done, it likely won’t happen.

Here are a few tips for blogging consistently, even when you don’t feel you have the time.

1.  Redefine what it means to blog consistently.

Perhaps you are trying to blog more frequently than you can realistically do consistently. While I think you should blog at least one day a week, trying to do more than that consistently may or may not be possible for you. Before you beat yourself up, make sure that your blogging goals are realistic.

2.  Have a blogging schedule.

I’ve determined that Monday and Thursday are the days that I’ll publish blog posts. Right now, it is 4:14 PM on a Monday. While writing this late in the day on Monday is not ideal, the fact that it’s Monday and I haven’t yet published a blog post today caused me to stop what I’m doing and write. Having set days to write blog posts sets an alarm that goes off in my mind on those days until I get the blog post written.

3.  Try to work ahead on your blog posts.

Working ahead is something I do sometimes, but obviously not always. It helps a lot, though, to write at least a couple of blog posts when I’m “in the zone” so that I don’t have to muscle my way through them when I’m not in the mood to write, or when things are overly busy (as they have been for me lately).

4.  Hire a content creator.

I’m a firm believer in being involved in your own content creation. But it can really help to have someone else do at least some of your content creation for you.

If you do hire someone to help, it’s best to still be involved in the process as is done with my Blogging Your Voice service. That way, the work still has your fingerprints, and your unique personality stamped all over it.

One of the best ways to handle content creation overwhelm is to create some of your own content, and pay someone else to create some of your content. For instance, I have some clients who have me write blog posts for them, but they produce their own videos. This can be the best of both worlds, because you can double the amount of content you publish consistently without taking a crazy amount of time or spending too much money. 

Your Turn

What about you? What ways have you found to blog consistently even when you feel like you don’t have time?

PCC 002: How to Conduct Great Podcast Interviews with Phyllis Nichols

podcast, why start a podcast, podcasting tips, benefits of podcasting

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One of the things I love the most about podcasting is that it is a great way to learn new things — whether you are the listening or the one creating the podcast.

Today is an example of that for me. Since I’m just starting this podcast, and since I plan to do a lot of interviews, I decided to focus my first interview on the topic of interviews, and grilled my guest, Phyllis Nichols, on the topic of interviews. The bottom line was that this was my first interview EVER, and she has done many interviews, so this was a great way for me to learn!

How to Conduct Great Interviews

In this episode we talked about how to conduct great interviews. Here are some of the things we covered:

  • Phyllis’ experience with interviews — both as an interviewer and as someone who has been interviewed
  • Different ways to conduct podcast interviews and the pros and cons of each way
  • How to come up with questions for interviews
  • What criteria to use when selecting someone to interview for your podcast
  • How much talking the interviewer should do, compared to how much talking the interviewee should do
  • How to prepare your podcast interviewee for the interview so that you can maximize the effectiveness of the interview
  • What types of technologies and services to use for interviews — even if you’re tech-phobic
  • The benefits of both being interviewed and interviewing others
  • What to do if you’re nervous about conducting interviews or being interviewed

Things Mentioned on This Episode

Phyllis Nichols

 You can learn more about Phyllis Nichols by visiting her website, Sound Advice Sales and Marketing.

Click here for the transcript.

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The Professional Content Creation Podcast: Content Creation | Blogging | Content Marketing